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     Body Talk: Porsche 991 GTE/GT3 1/32 Scaleauto build to DiSCA rules
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Tamar





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posted on 29-8-2016 at 01:23 Reply With Quote
Porsche 991 GTE/GT3 1/32 Scaleauto build to DiSCA rules



Porsche's nomenclature can be a bit confusing at times, for instance the Porsche that Scaleauto has now released is officially called the 991 GT3 but it's actually not an official GT3?! Modelled after the 2013 version of the 991 as raced at Le Mans 24hrs, WEC and in the American IMSA championship GTLM class....its officially a GTE car.

To cross the divide between the ACO GTE class and the FIA GT3 class manufacturers like Porsche and Ferrari have come up with car designs that can be adapted to different classes. Below 2 examples of the 991 in GT3 guise: on the left the Porsche as it is run in the IMSA GTD , to the right the car as run in the German VLN series (both open for GT3 cars only) I leave it up to the eagle eyed amongst you to spot the differences between the two versions


Confused by the nomenclature ...well don't be.. as the Scaleauto car is eligible for DiSCA's GT3 class as it is .



Which is a good thing as I had one of the white kits on my desk since last May, and as I now enjoy the rare luxery of a race ready Bentley for the upcoming Essex Double Six...I have a bit of time left for a side project




I really like this livery and its a perfect addintion to my in my recent builds of Yellow and black cars, and being able to build it straight out of the box (well nearly) will be a welcome change to all the sanding and reshaping I did on my previous builds .
First step as always is to do a full body wrap with masking tape to make templates for the decals.


to be continued




With kind regards
Tamar
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Grunz





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posted on 25-8-2016 at 23:55 Reply With Quote


Looking with interest. I really like this livery.
I think closing the vents near the rear wheel arches and creating the decals for the louvres on top of the front wheel arches should be straightforward (for you anyway ;-))
A bit more challenging is the third set of louvres on the front bonnet that the IMSA version has compared to the LM version.
That is what I have spotted so far.

I will have the #91 pretty soon (maybe beginning of next week).




with kind regards
Gio
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tamar





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posted on 29-8-2016 at 00:36 Reply With Quote


Lol, I had no doubt you would spot most of the differences, but since I will build this 991 to DiSCA GT3 spec I need to be a bit more conservative on the body mods.
Had this car been build for the LM 24hrs than yes changing the hood would have been possible, but for the GT3 car I'll leave the body stock...well almost.
Adding a "vanity" panel to mimic the different form of the central grille in the GT3 front spoiler would be possible, as would be the different shape of the fog lights.
The fender louvres are to pronounced to do as decals, but I might be able to copy some louvres from the Slot.it XJR12 C.




With kind regards
Tamar
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Grunz





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posted on 29-8-2016 at 01:16 Reply With Quote


I also noticed that on the rear there are more openings (rear bumper and between the tail lights) that need to be done. But again maybe not allowed per DiSCA GT3.
I thought that the IMSA/GT3 front grill would be part of the optional accessories in the white kit.

It is a pity that for 1/32 there are no third-parties doing detail parts for "upgrading" models.
This is quite the norm for airplane static models. You know, for an F18 you could buy any version of the ejection seats for any scale (1/72 to 1/24) to fit in models made by big companies like Tamiya.
Not to mention all the parts that you can buy just for opening up panels that come with realistic interiors and photo etched details.
The list of decals for recreating specific models or versions that mainstream companies do not make is virtually endless.

Anyway, back to the topic: hope you are able to finish it for the Essex race.




with kind regards
Gio
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tamar





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posted on 30-8-2016 at 01:28 Reply With Quote
Bumper bummer



QUOTE (GRUNZ @ 29 Aug 2016, 03:16)
I thought that the IMSA/GT3 front grill would be part of the optional accessories in the white kit.


Missed that remark..
As I was preparing the body templates I searched my Kit box for the parts to complete the GT3 bumper, could not find them, thought I had misplaced them somewhere (happens) But when I checked the Assembly PDF (page 4 picture below, PDF attached to this post) I saw that those parts are intended for...... a different body?! Since its pictured in the White kit assembly PDF...should we all have had 2 bodies? :D

It looks like Scaleauto started the final tooling for the 991 before it returned to using bespoke chassis for its 1/32 cars instead of the adjustable RT3 chassis. As a result there's an extra rear diffuser in the kit that wont fit anywhere on the 991 chassis, but does fit on a RT3.
The extra parts for the (to be reased) 2014 body were added to the Plastic and Clear sprues, so when that body will be released as a white kit...you're most likely going to get the 2013 parts as well ;)

I did a bit of research on the different Bumper versions options see above and below:

On the left the parts for the 991 as it debuted in the first round of the WEC @ Silverstone.
Wasn't the first time Porsche used a creative interpretation of the rules to create an aerodynamic advantage by recessing the shape of the light clusters.(Porsche 935)

In the middle the parts for the 2013 LM version, here they used the low drag foglight lenses that were flush with the bodywork to maximize top speed on the Mulsanne Straight.
For the rest of the season the 991's ran with the high downforce nose.

On the right the extra parts that are included in the white kit sprues, but are intended for the 2014 body. Apparently the FIA/ACO had closed the loophole in the rules,
as a result Porsche ditched the glass house bumper for a more durable one with just four small lenses..I imagine for slotracing purposes the 2014 body would be the best option as well. ;)

The 2014 body would also be the one that could be best used to build a true scale GT3...so there you have it, 3 different versions of the 991 GT3.... all of them actually a GTE.




With kind regards
Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 31-8-2016 at 06:23 Reply With Quote
Body templates update... flattening the bannana



After the brief side track, here's an update. I've made some progress with the decal templates for the Imsa Perfomance Kodak livery. Will have to do a test print to check the body templates, there's always a bit of loss in shape accuracy as you peel the masking tape of the body and flatten them to be scanned. Once I have done so I will post the templates as a PDF..should anyone want to do their own 991 livery




With kind regards
Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 1-9-2016 at 07:40 Reply With Quote
Body templates update...part II putting the skin back on the bannana



The next step, one that frequent readers will by now be familair with. Printed the templates on a sheet of A4 label sticker form Avery. As usual I cut the templates along the body panel lines. Started with the roof, them the hood and the trunk (although for a Porsche its actually the other way around.

Slowly worked my way around the body, must say the templates were pretty close to prefect, only the front and rear bumper need a bit of tweaking. Which was to be expected as these are the areas where the templates have to make the strongest curves around the body

Already re did the rear bumper, the front needs more work. This is also the stage where you decide what parts you will do as decal and what will need to be painted.Checking the my reference pictures I noticed that the dark grey areas on the Porsche are actually a dark Metallic grey...hmm ok so that wont be possible in decal. So it looks like I'll have to paint the yellow the black and the metallic grey, doing the white and red streamers as decals.


to be continued



With kind regards
Tamar
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Grunz





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posted on 1-9-2016 at 00:56 Reply With Quote


Looks really good Tamar! I like the DiSCA logos in the front, especially the one in the grill.



with kind regards
Gio
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tamar





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posted on 3-9-2016 at 14:36 Reply With Quote


Just a quick one, attached a PDF file with the templates for the Scaleauto Porsche 991 Windows

Attachment: Scaleauto_991_windows.pdf (246.47kb)
This file has been downloaded 181 times




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Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 19-3-2017 at 16:46 Reply With Quote
Time Flies... and change of plan



Time flies when your having fun....I have been busy moving house which has disrupted my slotactivities immensly. Busy now with doing the Proton Dempsey car (Or actually the DiSCA Proton car;) ).

Will get back to the Imsa Performance after that....might as well use this topic as a w.i.p. for the DiSCA Proton car as well..which will be modeled after the 2015 Dempsey Proton car.
 

 
For someone with a graphic background this livery is one of my favorites, and when Gary and I talked about doing a Porsche for the 6th edition of the Oxigen Le Mans 24hrs we both knew we would want to run the car in no other livery than this one. But I must say...doing the decals for this car has been the most challenging set I've ever worked on.

Started in the usual way, full body wrap with masking tape and then I started adding the basic position of the triangles.
 

 


These were then scanned in and re drawn in adobe illustrator. How simple it seems when you write ity down, but believe me...These few lines actually represent a couple of dozen trail and test prints before I had anytrhing closely resembling this image below. And that's just paper, which folds and curves different than decal.
The biggest problem, besides keeping check which colours to use was off course making the traingles match and fit the curved body. And with this livery every error shows up immidiately.
 


To be continued
 




With kind regards
Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 21-3-2017 at 02:44 Reply With Quote
Body Mods



Before I can start with decalling and painting there are some body mods that need to be done.
As mentioned before the Scaleauto white kits are for the 2013 body with the big glass house foglights. So to turn this into the 2015 Proton Dempsey car required some re-modelling of the front bumper.
(note by now Scaleauto has released the correct body, but alas it will be a while before those will become available as a white kit)

 
I thought of making a template and filling the gap in with pices of plasticard, but then I thought what the heck, that will require a lot of shaping and curving.. why not use the clear parts.
So I glued them in, they fitted very well, but around the edges they were not completely flush with the rest of the bumper
Used thick Zapp CA to glue them in and added an extra layer as a filler, sanded the whole bumper to get a flush and even surface.
Looks a bit rough right now, specially the clear parts,,,are no longer clear...but that's just optics.
I will have to dremel the new openings for the foglights anyway.
One layer of white primer and a final touch up with 600 grit and you wont see the difference.
Next point of attention was at the rear of the car. Fisrt thing I did was to open up a slot for the rear lights, then I worked on the attachment point of the rear bumper to the main body.
As you can see Scaleauto has used a pin&retaining tab that protrudes quite far into the rear wheel well.
If you're going to run big wheels, an offset pod and a bit of body float (as I will) there's the risk that the tab will rub on the rear tyres.
So I dremelled them away.


 
Like all Scaleauto cars, the Porsche 991 body is light and flexible, good for perfomance, not so good for durability ( the opposite being Carrera bodies).
Mind you they are strong enough for most of your regular slotracing activities...but running a car in the Oxigen LM 24hrs is beyond...regular.
Speeds on the 60ft long Mulsanne straight are way above regular.... and accidents do happen, specially at night....in the dark.
To reinforce joints I regularely use Kevlar strands pulled from a piece of Kevlar weave. You'll need a fresh and realy sharp pair of scissor to cut them to the right lenght as the stuff is almost unbreakable ;) Here too Zapp thick CA is used to seal the Kevals strands , fill the gaps and at the same time glue the parts together. I used it at the front as well to reinforce the front splitter and the edges around te glass panels. The results a strong and durable reinforcement that's less than 0,5mm thick.



to be continued



With kind regards
Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 1-3-2017 at 02:42 Reply With Quote
DiSCA LM Qualification



Late night, just back in the hotel after the first Qualification for the DiSCA Oxigen Le Mans 24hrs.
Managed to get both cars decalled in time, still need to do some minor detail work...but I must say....happy with how things have gone so far.
 
more news and images 2 morrow

with kind regards
Tamar




With kind regards
Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 17-8-2018 at 19:41 Reply With Quote
Post Race analysis part 1



Man I can't believe its already a week ago since we raced at Henley, still have not recovered completely.

@ Colin: (CMC decals) The medium grey colours might have been a bit off, compared to the original design, but your decals worked very well and are very strong. Check this image of the nose of our Porsche after 24hrs of hard racing.
I was amazed on how well they handled the abuse of full frontal contact...although in all honesty we did not have that many...only 3 warnings and 1 ten second stop and go penalty during the whole 24hrs :angel: 
So the decals on the nose were a bit battered, those on the rear had minor damage...and the roof (yes we did have a bit of turtle time) which was basically one big decal is still untouched. Only the small decals that I applied at the very last minute before Concourse (and did not cover with a coat of clear) came off partially.


I will finish my build report of the DiSCA Proton Porsche in the coming weeks.
So...to be continued
 
with kind regards
Tamar 
 

 

 
 




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Tamar
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tamar





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posted on 10-3-2017 at 13:26 Reply With Quote
Post Race Analysis, Part 2: Set-up



I got some questions about the Tech set-up of the Porsche. Normally I like to keep my build write ups in a chronologic order, but that might take a while..so to sooth you waiting pains...
Here's a quick description of the tech specs.;)
 
DiSCA- PROTON Porsche 991 Chassis TN991#001 & TN991#002
For the LM 24hrs we build 4 Porsches, with our team members scattered over the globe our "design" philosophy was to keep the cars as stock as possible so we could swap parts, but we also wanted to show that you can be competitive using a stock RTR slotcar as a base to build your endurance racer.

Gary (LMP) had already build chassis GS991#001 which we ran in the Suzula 6hrs. For the LM 24hrs this would serve as a back up T-car  Gio (Grunz) had build his GR991#001 to be used during free practice.
Both cars would serve as donor cars should we run out of spare wings, chips etc etc during the 24 hrs.
For the LM race Lennard (Maan) and I prepared two new Cars TN991#001 & TN991#002.

These had a 80% Scaleauto R chassis with a 0,75mm offset Slot.it sidewinder pod. Pods were modified to be able to run a 7,85mmø Sigma 14t pinion with a 17,5mmø spur.
This would give us the gear ratio we wanted for the long Mulsanne straight and take as much advantage of the motor magnet downforce with more than enough ground clearance. (1,85 mm with 20,8mmø wheels)
May sound complicated but its not, I did this by enlarging the holes for the motor and motor screws so we could angle the pinion side of the motor ≠0,6 mm forward (which actually makes the car a -1˚ anglewinder ;))
Chassis #001 ran with a slot.it PA01-54R reduced center diameter rear axle running in the stock slot.it olites.
For Chassis #002 I also modified the pod to accept 4,75mmø ballbearings (Scaleauto) and used a Scaleauto Titanium rear axle.
Besides the lower weight the titanium axle also has the benefit that it is non magnetic, so it has less "drag" from the motor magnet.
So there you have it nothing too fancy, just basic slotrace optimisation stuff, ;)
 
We did use one bespoke part in the chassis we raced (#002). A 3D printed bracket that mated the Slot.it pod to the Scaleauto side supension mounts on the chassis.
I have not made "clean" pictures of the finished chassis yet, the one below was taken during the build up of chassis #002 with chassis #001 in the background.
Here you see the test set-up for the bracket with the prototypes I cut from 1,5 mm GRP plate with the Scaleauto Supspension kit.
These were used for most of our testing and served as an template for the 3D drawing and prints kindly made for us by Stefan Kieviet (S-Slot) and printed via Shapeways.
Improvements over the prototype were the addition of 3DP retaining nuts (NSR/Olifer3D style) that would allow us to adjust the spring bolts without having to remove the body.

 
 
Chassis #001 also had some bespoke parts left over from my DBR9 chassis (O2 LM24hrs 2015) which used a lasercut GRP chassis.
In the spare box I found an extra set of front axlemounts which I used to make cambered stub axles with one ball bearing p/axle.
They worked well and definately looked good....but as they were glued to the Scaleauto chassis I had my doubts on the durabilty of the assembly in a hard crash.
The plan was to do these as an integrated 3DP part...but then time ran out..but who knows....maybe in the future.

 
 
 
Chassis TN991#002 Race set up:
So for durability and simplicity we chose to run Chassis#002 in the race.  Here we used a very simple straight trough carbon axle running in the stock chassis uprights.
I used Slotingplus Delrin 17,5mmø frontwheels which are about the lightest and most true non metal wheels you can get. The material is hard enough to drill, mill and cut a M2 thread in.
Which I did to be able to lock the wheels on the carbon axle with a M2 grubscrew. (to prevent the wheel spacing becoming too tight when hit from the side)
For the eagle eyed amongst you, it will be obvious why I wrote that it our Porsche(s) had a 80% Scaleauto chassis. During our testing we discovered that the front splitter (that is an integrated part of the R-chassis)
was hitting the high points on the track, and in digital racing on Ninco track that usually means parts of the LC's sticking out above the track surface. At first I raised the nose by fitting a 0,4mm spacer under the guide.
But it was still not enough to keep the nose clear of the track in all areas. When during testing I discoverd a crack in the splitter we decided to dremel the offending part off...and as can be seen in the picture below, removed the whole front section completely for our race set-up.
Those of you that have seen some of my previous build reports wont be surprised to see the nylon/ aluminium lock nut on top of the Guide.
We omitted the connector we used in Chassis#001 in the guide wires and used my preferred Silver Plated MB braids.
We used the 4 grubscrews in the chassis bedpans to mount the body straight and level, the biggest challenge here was to get both bodies sit on the chassis in the same way.
We kept the connector between the chip and the motor..because I'd already prepped and mounted them to all our spare chips....
...might keep them for testing....but won't do that any more for future endurance race set up's.
 

 
Although we build several chassis with the ability to change the set-up of the cars in a quick and easy way... we never came to that point during free practice.
Ok so our base set-up was pretty much fine tuned for Ninco track anyway...but to be honest, there was just not enough time to test and back test to get reliable data on the Le Mans track.
Time flies when you're having fun. The only set up change we made compared to our test runs on the Suzuka track was to use a different spur.
We'd been running with the 14t Sigma pinion all along using 31 - 33  Nylon sidewinder spurs. Our car was fast on the Mulsanne...but you know how it goes...you always try to get that little bit more speed.

So as I was mounting the hand out race motor for Q1, I went trough my spares box for a new 31 spur and noticed that I had one Scaleauto 16,8mmø Nylon 28t Anglewinder spur.
Our Motor had not been running hot with the 31t, nor did we experience any drop outs on the straight (which can be caused by interferrence from a sparking comm under full acceleration)
So I thought...hmmmmmm would it fit? :question:
So I tried and found that I just needed to move the motor 0,25 mm back to its original position to get a good mesh, but a anglewinder gear on a sidewinder motor...would it hold?
Well there was only one way to find out, use it in the two hrs of Qualification and see. And if it would wear out to much during the race..we could always switch back to the 31t sidewinder gear.
The only downside would be that we would need a bit more time to re-adjust the mesh by moving the motor.
We took the gamble and it paid of, we picked up just enough speed to be on par with the majority of the LMP1's on the Mulsanne...and look at the post race picture.
Both pinion and spur look brand new, not a mark on them. :thumb::thumb::thumb:
 
Ok that's it for now, more detailed post are to follow (even though this one became a lot more detailed that I thought...) so..
to be continued...
 




With kind regards
Tamar
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